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egypt » Mashareeb

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Jul
02


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Cairokee: The Sound of “Rock meets Arabic”

This might not be a new and orginal idea right now, but it was definitely new a couple of years ago. While many bands in Egypt were trying to play rock music and sing in arabic, not everybody really managed to pull it off. Cairokee was one of the bands who did pull it off pretty well and gained a good amount of supporters and a fan base. They have recently gained a lot of attention and success due to their famous revolution song “Sot El Horeya” or “The Sound of Freedom” and their song featured in the new Pepsi ad. They have also recently collaborated with Zap Tharwat and Hany Adel (West El Balad) on a track by the name “Ba7lam” or “I Dream”, you can check it out here.

The band consists of Amir Eid on vocals and guitar, Sherif Hawary on lead guitar and back vocals, Tamer Hashem on drums, Ahmed Bahaa on percussios, Sherif Mostafa on keyboard and Adam El Alfy on bass guitar. Their musical style can mainly be described as soft or classic rock, with some Egyptian and arabic inlfuence every now and then. The highlight of the band would be the spoken arabic (3ammeya or slang) vocals, that do work well with their western musical style. They sing about social and political issues in the Egyptian society, from love to hate and from depression to dreams.

They have released 2 albums so far, the first one was released in 2009, the album didn’t really have a title name and was distributed as part of a Coca-Cola campaign (it also had their own cover of the famous Coca-Cola song).

If you want to check it out, the album can be downloaded from here. (link provided by Egyptian Bands Blog)

The second album, titled “Matloub Za3eem” or “A Leader Is Wanted” was released on the 30th of June by a concert at The Sawy Culture Wheel. You can watch the album teaser here.

Their new video for the song “Matloob Za3eem” can be seen here on El Gomhoreya TV (you must register to watch the video).

Here’s their first ever music video for the song “Kol El Nas“:

This is an amazing rock cover they’ve made with Ousso (Eftekasat & Nagham masry) for Sheikh Imam‘s classic “La7ma“:

This also another interesting song they’ve made that did not make it in any of their albums by the name of  “Salam Ya Man“:

And lastly, an excerpt from their first album “Habibi Ya Metala3 3einy“:

Their website is currently down (it was really cool website! We hope they bring it back to life soon!), but you can get updates about their shows from their facebook page.

Jun
06


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Carlos Latuff: Khaled Saeed’s Best Brazilian Friend

Today marks the first anniversary of Khaled Saeed‘s death, a day that represents the start of a wave of changes in the history of Egypt. We thought it would be a good idea to share some comics/caricatures that the very talented Brazilian political cartoonist Carlos Latuff drew during the 25th of January revolution while highlighting the role of Khaled Saaed in it. Carlos may not be Egyptian and has never met Khaled before, but he simply nailed it with his drawings and succeeded in representing what every single Egyptian felt at that time. May Khaled and all of Egypt ‘s martyr’s souls rest in peace.

If you’re interested to see more of Carlos Latuff‘s 25th of January comics, you can find some here.

Apr
25


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Sham El Nessim 2011

Today we celebrate a purely Egyptian holiday that does not sepereate people based on beliefs, a day that unites us all and reminds us of our culture, our heritage and our history.

Sham El Nessim can be traced back to 2700 B.C., a holiday that Ancient Egyptians used to celebrate.

Here’s a small excerpt from Wikipedia explaining the origin of  this ancient holiday:

The name of the holiday is derived from the Egyptian name of the Harvest Season, known as Shemu, which means a day ofcreation. According to annals written by Plutarch during the 1st century AD, the Ancient Egyptians used to offer salted fish, lettuce, and onions to their deities on this day.

The former chairman of the Antiquities Authority, explains that:

The spring festival coincided with the vernal equinox and the ancients imagined that that day represented the beginning of creation. The date of Sham ennesim was not fixed. Rather, it was announced every year on the night before the feast at the foot of the Great Pyramid. The feast of Shemu, means “renewal of life”. The Ancient Egyptians first celebrated the feast of Shemu in 2700 BC, towards the end of the 3rd Dynasty.

In his book, Manners and Customs of the Modern EgyptiansEdward William Lane wrote in 1834:

A custom termed ‘Shemm en-Nessem‘ (or the Smelling of the Zephyr) is observed on the first day of the Khamaseen. Early in the morning of this day, many persons, especially women, break an onion, and smell it; and in the course of the forenoon many of the citizens of Cairo ride or walk a little way into the country, or go in boats, generally northward, to take the air, or, as they term it, smell the air, which on that day they believe to have a wonderfully beneficial effect. The greater number dine in the country or on the river. This year they were treated with a violent hot wind, accompanied by clouds of dust, instead of the neseem; but considerable numbers, notwithstanding, went out to ‘smell’ it.

We hope everybody enjoys a very joyful and wonderful day, this would be the best opportunity to celebrate a new dawn for Egypt.

كل عام والمصريين بخير

source: Sham El Nessim Wikipedia Page

Mar
17


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Revolution Art: Graffiti

Graffiti and mural art has been part of the revolution, drawings and paintings on the walls of Cairo streets has been expressing what people felt, what they were going through and what their dreams where all about. Even the protest signs were somehow considered as a mobile mural art or graffiti.

Here’s a very interesting facebook page by the name of Revolution Graffiti that we found.

The page has lots of great artwork of graffiti and mural paintings from the street of Cairo (about the revolution of course).

Also, Egyptian artist  Ganzeer started a really great intiative, a project about mural paintings of the revolution’s martyrs. So far, only 2 have been completed with the help of Ahmed Nadim, Ahmed Eid, Lissie Jaquette, Henriette Heisse, Mustafa El Gamal, Ahmed Hussein, Rodina G, Noha Hesham, Hannah Cooper, Islam safi and others.

The goal behind the project, according to him, is to “…on one hand, honor the martyrs, and on another hand provide passers-by with a reminder of Egypt’s struggle for freedom, democracy, and equality.

And for twitter users, a hashtag has been created, #martyrmurals to follow the project’s updates.

Here’s a Reportage about one of Ganzeer’s murals:

Reportage on “El Teneen” graffiti artists:

sources: Ganzeer’s blog

Mar
14


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Sips From The Nile: Five Things I Learned From The Egyptian Revolution

“Sips From The Nile” is a series of articles, written by Basil El Dabh, that will be featured on Mashareeb. Basil is an American born Egyptian who decided to move to Egypt for a couple of years after graduating from college for a job opportunity. He writes about his experience going back to his roots and living in Egypt after spending his whole life in the United States.

Five Things I Learned from the Egyptian Revolution

It sounds cliché, but many people have spent the last few weeks learning a lot about both the world around them and themselves. Egypt has entered a new age, and
while this is just the end of the beginning with much rebuilding and restrategizing to come, the milestone reached last Friday provides a great opportunity for reflection.
1. Egyptian pride is alive – Coming from the United States, I have grown to take the concept of patriotism for granted. Patriotism in Egypt was not only virtually dead prior to January 25, but it had come with a very concerning inferiority complex. To many Egyptians, their country was a place to which they were begrudgingly bound by birth. It was beyond many that I spoke with as to why I would leave a developed and advanced country that I had spent my entire life in to call Cairo my home. Don’t get me wrong – Egyptians have always possessed a definite love for their country, a love without which the last few weeks would not have been possible, but it’s fair to say not many looked around their ancient and storied nation with pride. But this has definitely changed. Egyptians are now proud enough of their country to clean up the streets. They are proud to see that as they seek a better life, the rest of the world virtually stopped in suspense, and most importantly they are proud enough to recognize that they have been blessed with a country that they can now change for the better.
2. A whole is equal to the sum of its parts – Any Egyptian has numerous stories reflecting this. A political party, a religious faction, or a disgruntled minority did not sustain the January 25th Revolution. The hundreds of thousands, if not millions that took to the streets in cities and towns across Egypt sustained it. The men who protected their neighborhoods through long nights sustained it. Those directing traffic with no incentives sustained it. Doctors and nurses who provided pro bono care to those injured sustained it. Any of the millions of Egyptians that did their best to keep life going as the government completely shut down sustained it. People proudly did their part to help one another at no cost sustained it. Two months ago, if someone had told me that Egypt would see days in which there were no police on the streets, I would have envisioned chaos and injustice taking the reigns. And I would have been proven seriously wrong. The police and security forces are not the stewards of this country…its people are.
3. The critical role of media – Especially when Egyptians lacked Internet access and other fundamental forms of communication for any 21st century society, the media stepped in and played a huge role. International media outlets continued their 24-hour coverage despite the continuous detainment of their correspondents and journalists. Individuals such as Al Jazeera’s Ayman Mohyeldin were arrested, only to be released and not only remain in the country, but also continue their coverage for millions around the world.
4. Unity – Regardless of what some people would have you believe, this was a unified revolution in every aspect. This is especially important to highlight in a country with deep religious and socioeconomic divides. People I’ve spoken to abroad express worries that the events that have taken place have left the country wide open for the Muslim Brotherhood to take over. All I can say is if reform is carried out in the same spirit as the protests were, we’re about to bear witness to an Egypt with more equal opportunities and less marginalization. One day when leaving Tahrir Square with my cousin, an older man with a beard asked us if we knew where to closest mosque was so that he could go pray. We responded saying no, and that we are Christian. He then looked at us and asked, “Are you Egyptians?
”  We said “Yes” and he replied “We’re all Egyptians… we’re all the same.”

5. Change does not necessarily entail chaos – It’s an age-old dilemma, especially with regard to the Arab World: Isn’t stability more important than democracy and reform? For weeks, Mubarak and Suleiman menacingly presented themselves as beacons of stability, as opposed to the alleged inevitable chaos that would take place in their absence…some people even fell for it. Suggestions by international leaders and analysts that the region needs strong dictators to preserve long-term stability are borderline insulting – an insinuation that people in the region are incapable of responsibly governing themselves. In reality, if long-term stability depends on a small group of people and their cronies, then we all have bigger problems. As Egyptians prepare for a 2011 of economic challenges, they know that they have the assets to not only bounce back, but to come back even stronger without a corrupt regime siphoning billions of dollars from those who truly deserve it. The country still has a long way to go to transform into the nation that many Egyptians want it to be, but as long as those who desire change remain committed, it’s inevitable. Decades of corrupt governance suppressing intellectual and social rights hardened the Egyptian people- a group historically characterized by its light- heartedness and openness. But, as someone proudly told me…”Egyptian history stopped for 30 years, but now it’s back.”

Mar
07


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Revolution Art: Videos

“Art is the process or product of deliberately arranging elements in a way to affect the senses or emotions.”

We used this definition to describe art in Mashareeb’s agenda (and we swear that our agenda is not a foreign one!).

In moments like the ones we are witnessing right now in Egypt, people are experiencing a mixture of emotions and most of them are eager to express themselves in way or another. We have seen people taking pictures, shooting videos, making songs, writing poems, creating signs and they are most definitely putting a flavor to this revolution. Times like these witness the best work of creativity from people because it’s all about self expression, dreams, hopes and emotions. As Mashareeb supports Egyptian creativity, we wanted to gather as much as we can from the creative results of the 25th of January’s revolution (made by Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and present them to you.

These posts are all dedicated to the lives of the protests’ martyrs.

We will never forget you.

May your souls rest in peace.

Revolution Videos

We’re finally back with our second revolution post! This time it’s about videos and animations done during the revolution or inspired by the revolution. Probably videos were the first art form to hit the internet concerning the 25th of January revoltuion (along side photography). Some videos were done by Egyptians while other were created by foreigners who got inspired by what they saw on tv. To be honest, the videos are numerous! So many to count and follow up with. We gathered the most famous, most touching, funniest and better produced ones for you. We really had a hard time finding out who actually made some of these videos, we did our best to write down the creator…as for the ones with no creators, if you know who made that video, don’t hesitate to contact us! We would love to give credit to the creators!

Egyptian Revolution Jan 25th the story – Take What’s Yours!

Egyptian Revolution 25 Jan The Story – قصة الثورة المصرية

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZxzhcU5ah2o&feature=player_embedded

SELMEYA – 25 Jan | سلمية – ٢٥ يناير (by Alaa Khaled)

Will You Support Egypt (by Tamer Shaaban)

Egyptian Revolution 2011 COMPLETE

Thank You World Media

Egyptian Protesters in Tahrir Square in the “Week of Resilience” (by Eskandar Production)

I’m the Egyptian – انا المصرى

إحتفالات تنحي مبارك في مصر الجديدة (by Hani Eskandar)

Egypt Tomorrow – مصر بكرة

Mr  NaNa in Egypt

Mr  NaNa in Egypt 2

علشان مصر ‎- مافيش حاجة تانية (by Mohamed Kheidr / PMC Egypt)

Rise, Proud Egyptian – إرفع رأسك، أنت مصري (by Mohamed Kheidr / PMC Egypt)

قَسَم شعب مصر – مَصْر بُكْرة (by Masr Bokra)

الحقيقة وراء وائل غنيم

الريس بهيس 1 (by Kharabeesh)

الريس بهيس 2 (By Kharabeesh)

الريس بهيس 3 (By Kharabees)

Mabrouk Egypt From The World – مبروك لمصر من كل الدنيا

Voice of Freedom صوت الحرية ( by Kharabeesh)

From Egypt With Love

Nefsy Ya Masr – Egypt, I Wish – نفسي يا مصر (by LCA Media Productions)

Hosni Mubarak Sings “I Did it My Way” (by HerBunk)

#25th Jan Ahmed Mekky’s  (by Aya Ahmed)

ولّا إيه – الحلقة صفر (Walla Eih – Episode 0)

The Birth Of A New Egypt

From Union Square to Tahrir Square

Feb
20


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Revolution Art: Music

“Art is the process or product of deliberately arranging elements in a way to affect the senses or emotions.” We used this definition to describe art in Mashareeb’s agenda (and we swear that our agenda is not a foreign one!). In moments like the ones we are witnessing right now in Egypt, people are experiencing a mixture of emotions and most of them are eager to express themselves in way or another. We have seen people taking pictures, shooting videos, making songs, writing poems, creating signs and they are most definitely putting a flavor to this revolution. Times like these witness the best work of creativity from people because it’s all about self expression, dreams, hopes and emotions. As Mashareeb supports Egyptian creativity, we wanted to gather as much as we can from the creative results of the 25th of January’s revolution (made by Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and present them to you.

These posts are all dedicated to the lives of the protests’ martyrs.

We will never forget you.

May your souls rest in peace.

Revolution Music

Our first post from the revolution art posts will be dedicated to the music inspired by the revolution. Egyptian musicians have all been inspired by the current events and some of them have actually been an inspiration for the revolution. The inspiration did not stop here in Egypt, people from all over the world contributed and dedicated songs to the revolution and the Egyptian people. We tried to gather as much as we can all the songs that has been surfacing the internet talking about the revolution. If you think we missed some, please don’t hesitate to send us whatever you have.

(songs are posted in no specific order)

 

إحلم معايا (Dream With Me) – Hamza Namira

Sout Al Horeya صوت الحريه – Amir Eid, Hany Adel, Hawary On Guitar & Sherif On Keyboards

Translation available if you click on “cc”

the track’s final mix is available for download here:

Long live Egypt / تحيا مصر – Scarabeuz & Omima

إزاي !؟  ‎- محمد منير

25th January – Ahmed Mekki (Ft. Mohamed Mohsen)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uG-kjy8TyQo

وقت الثورجية – الثورجية

One Day the Sun Will Explode – Highly Suspect

#Jan25 – Omar Offendum, The Narcicyst, Freeway, Ayah, Amir Sulaiman (Prod. by Sami Matar)

بحبك يا بلادي – Aziz Elshafhi & Ramy Gamal

Rise to Freedom – Natacha Atlas and Basha Beats

My Peeps (Home Version) – Hany Mustafa

قالوا مجنون اللي يفكر – Taxi Band

سواق تاكسي (censored) – Eyad

El Eyoun El Samra – Property of Nadia Shanab

تاكى و بوجى – ثورة بدون زعيم

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AyLj2PtX8A&playnext=1&list=PL93B181CA7D540989

سيتى باند – سامعين غُنانا

The Price of Freedom – Shady Ahmed

Tahrir Revolution – Jay Samel

رامي عصام – الثورة

See you tomorrow – Tahrir Square Protestors

إرحل – Tahrir Square Protestors

اضحكوا يا ثوره – Tahrir Square Protestors

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47_FjIMDMyI

Freedom (Song For Egypt) – Wyclef Jean

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efcn8LpwlPo

Hey There Mubarak (Hey There Delilah parody)

Bon Jovi – No Apologies (dedicated to the facebook rebellion that began in Egypt)

Al Thawra – Micolagist

Er7al (English Version) – The Past 10s

Immortal Egypt / Revolution Dub – Dj Zhao

Yalla Masr Dub – Dubzonic

The Bleeding Egyptian (DEMO) – Fady D (Mashareeb Artist)

HIGHER (Tribute To Egypt) – Patriarch, Ghazi, Kaotiq and Anna

Egyptian Revolution – Bongo Christ

Egyptian Revolution – DJ EBBO – ORIGINAL MIX 11-2-11

Jan25 ( Egypt Revolution ) – MADMOODSELECTOR

2om Ya Msri – Alaa Azzam

Egyptian Revolution Blues – Sandy Cash

The Uprising – Wrench.se

Egyptian Revolution Song – Shivasongetr

50-brave-women-n-a-dream-2-save-us – Silent Tristero

Feb
10


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Long Live The Free People Of Egypt

Nov
25


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PMC Egypt: We Are Egyptians

A couple of months ago, a video called “Proud Egyptians أنا مصري” went viral on Youtube and Facebook in the Egyptian community. The video was created by a group of people (originally a Facebook group) with the name of PMC Egypt.

We’re not sure what PMC stands for, but we are sure what these people are trying to do and what message they’re trying to give out. PMC Egypt is a group of hopeful young people trying to send out a message of hope. They created two videos so far to spread their message, we’re not going to explain or analyse them, the videos are very clear and speak out for themselves.

Proud Egyptians أنا مصري

ماهمه كنا مختلفين..إيه ألي بيجمعناه كلنا !!!..We are Egyptians

Here’s a link to their facebook page to stay updated to their latest videos and their twitter account if you would like to follow them.

Nov
07


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Dad, I Have Brought You “Shame”

You may agree or disagree with this article written by Nawara Negm in El Dostor, but you can’t deny it does sum up a lot of what goes in our minds. It mentions some concepts and assumptions we strongly believe in and these beliefs are sometimes the reason why we behave the way we do. The harsh tone and the dark humor in this article makes reading it feel like a slap in the face, but it will certainly make you reconsider having an opinion, believing in some theories or reacting about something you’ve heard.

You can read the article here.

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