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على الصينية » Mashareeb

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Jul
05


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Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar: فورمة الساحل ٢٠١١

illustration & idea by Fady

Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar is a series of unrelated comic illustrations reflecting the reactions and behavior of the Egyptian people towards news, events and pretty much everything happening around them.

Why Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar? (Tea with milk & sugar)

It’s a hot drink that serves the purpose of temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness, very famous in local coffee shops as it’s a focal point in social gatherings and the sugar adds sweetness to it, which is pretty much what Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar (the comic series) also tends to be.

 

 

شاي بحليب و سكر سلسلة من الرسوم الهزلية الغير متصلة تعكس ردود أفعال و سلوك الشعب المصري تجاه الأحداث والأخبار و كل شيء يحدث من حولهم

لماذا شاي بحليب و سكر؟

لأنه مشروب ساخن يخدم غرض درء النعاس مؤقتا واستعادة اليقظة ومشهور جدا في المقاهي كما انه نقطة محورية في اللقاءات الاجتماعية والسكر يضيف له طعم حلو و لذيذ، وهو الى حد كبير ما شاي بحليب وسكر(السلسلة الهزلية) يميل أن يكون

 

سخن، لذيذ، يفوق

 

Jul
02


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Cairokee: The Sound of “Rock meets Arabic”

This might not be a new and orginal idea right now, but it was definitely new a couple of years ago. While many bands in Egypt were trying to play rock music and sing in arabic, not everybody really managed to pull it off. Cairokee was one of the bands who did pull it off pretty well and gained a good amount of supporters and a fan base. They have recently gained a lot of attention and success due to their famous revolution song “Sot El Horeya” or “The Sound of Freedom” and their song featured in the new Pepsi ad. They have also recently collaborated with Zap Tharwat and Hany Adel (West El Balad) on a track by the name “Ba7lam” or “I Dream”, you can check it out here.

The band consists of Amir Eid on vocals and guitar, Sherif Hawary on lead guitar and back vocals, Tamer Hashem on drums, Ahmed Bahaa on percussios, Sherif Mostafa on keyboard and Adam El Alfy on bass guitar. Their musical style can mainly be described as soft or classic rock, with some Egyptian and arabic inlfuence every now and then. The highlight of the band would be the spoken arabic (3ammeya or slang) vocals, that do work well with their western musical style. They sing about social and political issues in the Egyptian society, from love to hate and from depression to dreams.

They have released 2 albums so far, the first one was released in 2009, the album didn’t really have a title name and was distributed as part of a Coca-Cola campaign (it also had their own cover of the famous Coca-Cola song).

If you want to check it out, the album can be downloaded from here. (link provided by Egyptian Bands Blog)

The second album, titled “Matloub Za3eem” or “A Leader Is Wanted” was released on the 30th of June by a concert at The Sawy Culture Wheel. You can watch the album teaser here.

Their new video for the song “Matloob Za3eem” can be seen here on El Gomhoreya TV (you must register to watch the video).

Here’s their first ever music video for the song “Kol El Nas“:

This is an amazing rock cover they’ve made with Ousso (Eftekasat & Nagham masry) for Sheikh Imam‘s classic “La7ma“:

This also another interesting song they’ve made that did not make it in any of their albums by the name of  “Salam Ya Man“:

And lastly, an excerpt from their first album “Habibi Ya Metala3 3einy“:

Their website is currently down (it was really cool website! We hope they bring it back to life soon!), but you can get updates about their shows from their facebook page.

Jun
06


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Carlos Latuff: Khaled Saeed’s Best Brazilian Friend

Today marks the first anniversary of Khaled Saeed‘s death, a day that represents the start of a wave of changes in the history of Egypt. We thought it would be a good idea to share some comics/caricatures that the very talented Brazilian political cartoonist Carlos Latuff drew during the 25th of January revolution while highlighting the role of Khaled Saaed in it. Carlos may not be Egyptian and has never met Khaled before, but he simply nailed it with his drawings and succeeded in representing what every single Egyptian felt at that time. May Khaled and all of Egypt ‘s martyr’s souls rest in peace.

If you’re interested to see more of Carlos Latuff‘s 25th of January comics, you can find some here.

Jun
05


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The Chair Carrier: An Egyptian Award Winning Short Film

This movie has been circulating for a while on social media websites, it was actually done before the 25th of January and was uploaded to the internet on the 29th of January. It has attracted lots of attention and admiration from people for the amazing production & directing. The movie is an adaptation to the short story “The Chair Carrier” written by Dr. Yusuf Idris, directed by Tarek Khalil and starring Hassan Abdel-Fattah and Magdi Idris. It’s a great piece of art, from its message to its acting, filming and direction. The hard work has paid off and the movie has won lots of awards, and it definitely deserves it.

– You can watch the movie here:

– here’s also two videos from the “Masr El-Naharda” show with Tarek Khalil talking about the movie:

List of awards the movie has won:

“Winner” Best satire for October (2010) – American International film festival (AIFF)

“Silver award “student film competition” California Film Awards (2010)

“Official Selection” Manhattan Film Festival (2011)

“Official Selection” Edgemar short Film Festival (2011)

“Official Selection”International Freethought Film Festival(IFFF)(2011)

“Official Selection” 360|365 George Eastman House Film Festival(Kodak)(2011)

“Winner” Silver Lei Award – Honolulu Film Awards (2011)

“Winner” Merrit award fall (2010) for Experimental short ” Los Angeles cinema festival of hollywood”

“Winner” Award of excellence for international short and “Winner” for Best cinematography
“Los Angeles Movie Awards” (2010)

and if you would like to read the original story written by Yusuf Idris himself you can find it here (Translated in English).

May
24


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Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar: #1

 

 

illustration & idea by Fady

Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar is a series of unrelated comic illustrations reflecting the reactions and behavior of the Egyptian people towards news, events and pretty much everything happening around them.

Why Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar? (Tea with milk & sugar)

It’s a hot drink that serves the purpose of temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness, very famous in local coffee shops as it’s a focal point in social gatherings and the sugar adds sweetness to it, which is pretty much what Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar (the comic series) also tends to be.

 

 

شاي بحليب و سكر سلسلة من الرسوم الهزلية الغير متصلة تعكس ردود أفعال و سلوك الشعب المصري تجاه الأحداث والأخبار و كل شيء يحدث من حولهم

لماذا شاي بحليب و سكر؟

لأنه مشروب ساخن يخدم غرض درء النعاس مؤقتا واستعادة اليقظة ومشهور جدا في المقاهي كما انه نقطة محورية في اللقاءات الاجتماعية والسكر يضيف له طعم حلو و لذيذ، وهو الى حد كبير ما شاي بحليب وسكر(السلسلة الهزلية) يميل أن يكون

 

سخن، لذيذ، يفوق

May
14


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Interview: Ganzeer

 

We’ve been really excited about this interview but due to the current events Egypt has been going through we had to delay it. We don’t want to sound very cliché by saying “better late than ever”, but that’s pretty much the case here!

We’ve been very lucky to have an interview with Mohamed Famhy (a.k.a Ganzeer) and it is time for this interview to see the light!

If you’re not familiar with who Ganzeer is, check out our posts Ganzeer: The Alias of Mohamed Fahmy and Revolution Art: Graffiti to know more about him

notice: since people have been dividing the history of Egypt into 2 eras (Pre-Jan 25 and Post-Jan 25), we would like to inform you that this interview is Pre-Jan 25.

Interview:

- How did you start getting into illustration and graphic designing?

Ganzeer: Well I grew up reading comic books, and pretty much just trying to copy the awesome art in their pages. Although comic books are a particular passion of mine, and its something I would definitely love to do, to make, I’m also equally interested in graphic design. This interest of course came a lot later, during my last year in business school. But trying to analyze my interests, why I like comics so much, and why I eventually grew to love graphic design is… well I think has a lot to do with communication. There’s something incredibly expressive about comics. The characters, their reactions, their faces, their body language. The way comics are laid out and how you can use that for even more expression. The lettering (typography) and what you can do with it. The colors. The dialogue and stories. All of this just made me interested in communicated ideas and how you can affect someone in their hearts using a variety of mediums. So yeah, graphic design, I think I first started learning it out of necessity, because during my last year in college, I noticed how a lot of artists I admired had websites, so I figured it might be a good idea to create a website to put my sketches on. So I had to learn web design, which, of course, involves graphic design. It was horrendous, but I eventually got offered to design a logo here and a brochure there anyway, and things just evolved from there.

- Why “Ganzeer“? And how did the “Ganzeer” idea get established?

Ganzeer: When I first started Ganzeer, I had intended on putting together a multidisciplinary design collective. “Ganzeer,” is Arabic for bike chain, which is a series of stand alone metal parts, when connected, they make a whole, and together as a whole they are able to connect gears together to keep them moving. It made sense to me at the time, but what happened later was that the whole collective thing never really worked out and I ended up working at Ganzeer all on my own, so the name just eventually became associated with me, and I just went ahead and adopted it as such.

- What are the things that inspire you?

Ganzeer: Shit, man. Everything!

- What is it like to be a Freelancer?

Ganzeer: It’s like having a dozen different jobs at the same time. You’re the designer, you’re the manager, you’re the sales man, accountant, production manager, secretary, and office boy. It’s tough. But then again, working with people can also be tough.

- You were recently in Noord, Netherlands, working on a project. Can you tell us a little bit about this project and how did you get the chance to participate in it?

Ganzeer: Although Amsterdam Noord is part of Amsterdam, a lot of Amsterdammers don’t really consider or treat Noord as such, so it’s quite an interesting situation for the Dutch. I, along with many other artists, was invited to do a project on Noord. I ended up doing what I titled Noorderlijk Character(istics), which was basically a series of maps of Noord, each map for a different date. The official neighborhoods of Noord were illustrated as characters, each character visually representing the “character” of each neighborhood. Basically using the art of character design as a mapping tool.

You can find more on that here: http://ganzeer.blogspot.com/2010/11/noordelijk-characteristics.html

How I got the chance to participate; well a couple years back, Independent Dutch curator was Nat Muller was a resident at the Townhouse Gallery and had a chance to live and work in Cairo for a while and thus meet a lot of local artists. So when she dreamed up this Noord project and pitched it to Mediamatic, I was one of the chosen artists considered for participation.

- What was your best experience while participating in a project? And how different is working on art by your own from participating with people?

Ganzeer: Well in this case, there was a central topic for all the artists to work within, that topic being Noord. But the topic is so vast that there’s so much to do, and each artist was pretty much working on his/her own, so it wasn’t really much of a collaboration, although it wouldn’t have been possible without the many researchers and “show builders” made available to help out with anything the artists needed. Still, it’s quite different from collaborating on a project with different artists, which I haven’t had a chance to do a whole lot of, but would definitely love to do more of.

- Are you working on any projects right now? Or are there any “Ganzeer” projects coming soon?

Ganzeer: Commercial projects aside, I think the most relevant thing I’m working on now is a screen-specific Arabic typeface project in collaboration with friend and designer Gaber.

- If somebody thinks he has some kind of talent, what do you think he should do?

Ganzeer: I guess they should hone their craft.

- Do you think art can touch/affect people? (if yes) In what ways?

Ganzeer: It can make people think, laugh, cry, or scream. It can amaze people, shock them, or amuse them. Just like a good comic book, song, or movie.

- What are your goals and dreams?

Ganzeer: I dunno anymore, man. I’m kind of in an odd, undefined, meta sort of state right now.

- You’ve traveled to different places and countries to work on projects. What do you think about the state of art in Egypt? And how is it different from other countries (Arab and non-Arab)?

Ganzeer: To sum it all up, I think Egypt has a lot of material to create art about. There’s just so much to tackle. I’m not sure if the same necessarily applies to other Arab countries, since I haven’t had the chance to visit many, but I didn’t feel it was the state in some of the European countries I’ve visited. Although there seems to be a lot more room out there for creativity and creating in general.

- Do you think art can play a role in improving Egypt?

Ganzeer: I hope so, man. I really do. Otherwise, I’ma have to make a drastic career change.

We would like to thank Ganzeer for his time and for giving us this opportunity!

We can already see art changing Egypt to the better, and we are pretty sure he will play an important role in this change.

Here are some links to stay updated with Ganzeer‘s work:

Website: www.ganzeer.com

Blog: ganzeer.blogspot.com

Tumblr: ganzeer.tumblr.com

Twitter: twitter.com/#!/ganzeer

May
09


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Shai Be7aleeb We Sokar: Coming Soon

coming soon to Mashareeb

Apr
25


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Sham El Nessim 2011

Today we celebrate a purely Egyptian holiday that does not sepereate people based on beliefs, a day that unites us all and reminds us of our culture, our heritage and our history.

Sham El Nessim can be traced back to 2700 B.C., a holiday that Ancient Egyptians used to celebrate.

Here’s a small excerpt from Wikipedia explaining the origin of  this ancient holiday:

The name of the holiday is derived from the Egyptian name of the Harvest Season, known as Shemu, which means a day ofcreation. According to annals written by Plutarch during the 1st century AD, the Ancient Egyptians used to offer salted fish, lettuce, and onions to their deities on this day.

The former chairman of the Antiquities Authority, explains that:

The spring festival coincided with the vernal equinox and the ancients imagined that that day represented the beginning of creation. The date of Sham ennesim was not fixed. Rather, it was announced every year on the night before the feast at the foot of the Great Pyramid. The feast of Shemu, means “renewal of life”. The Ancient Egyptians first celebrated the feast of Shemu in 2700 BC, towards the end of the 3rd Dynasty.

In his book, Manners and Customs of the Modern EgyptiansEdward William Lane wrote in 1834:

A custom termed ‘Shemm en-Nessem‘ (or the Smelling of the Zephyr) is observed on the first day of the Khamaseen. Early in the morning of this day, many persons, especially women, break an onion, and smell it; and in the course of the forenoon many of the citizens of Cairo ride or walk a little way into the country, or go in boats, generally northward, to take the air, or, as they term it, smell the air, which on that day they believe to have a wonderfully beneficial effect. The greater number dine in the country or on the river. This year they were treated with a violent hot wind, accompanied by clouds of dust, instead of the neseem; but considerable numbers, notwithstanding, went out to ‘smell’ it.

We hope everybody enjoys a very joyful and wonderful day, this would be the best opportunity to celebrate a new dawn for Egypt.

كل عام والمصريين بخير

source: Sham El Nessim Wikipedia Page

Mar
17


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Revolution Art: Graffiti

Graffiti and mural art has been part of the revolution, drawings and paintings on the walls of Cairo streets has been expressing what people felt, what they were going through and what their dreams where all about. Even the protest signs were somehow considered as a mobile mural art or graffiti.

Here’s a very interesting facebook page by the name of Revolution Graffiti that we found.

The page has lots of great artwork of graffiti and mural paintings from the street of Cairo (about the revolution of course).

Also, Egyptian artist  Ganzeer started a really great intiative, a project about mural paintings of the revolution’s martyrs. So far, only 2 have been completed with the help of Ahmed Nadim, Ahmed Eid, Lissie Jaquette, Henriette Heisse, Mustafa El Gamal, Ahmed Hussein, Rodina G, Noha Hesham, Hannah Cooper, Islam safi and others.

The goal behind the project, according to him, is to “…on one hand, honor the martyrs, and on another hand provide passers-by with a reminder of Egypt’s struggle for freedom, democracy, and equality.

And for twitter users, a hashtag has been created, #martyrmurals to follow the project’s updates.

Here’s a Reportage about one of Ganzeer’s murals:

Reportage on “El Teneen” graffiti artists:

sources: Ganzeer’s blog

Mar
14


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Sips From The Nile: Five Things I Learned From The Egyptian Revolution

“Sips From The Nile” is a series of articles, written by Basil El Dabh, that will be featured on Mashareeb. Basil is an American born Egyptian who decided to move to Egypt for a couple of years after graduating from college for a job opportunity. He writes about his experience going back to his roots and living in Egypt after spending his whole life in the United States.

Five Things I Learned from the Egyptian Revolution

It sounds cliché, but many people have spent the last few weeks learning a lot about both the world around them and themselves. Egypt has entered a new age, and
while this is just the end of the beginning with much rebuilding and restrategizing to come, the milestone reached last Friday provides a great opportunity for reflection.
1. Egyptian pride is alive – Coming from the United States, I have grown to take the concept of patriotism for granted. Patriotism in Egypt was not only virtually dead prior to January 25, but it had come with a very concerning inferiority complex. To many Egyptians, their country was a place to which they were begrudgingly bound by birth. It was beyond many that I spoke with as to why I would leave a developed and advanced country that I had spent my entire life in to call Cairo my home. Don’t get me wrong – Egyptians have always possessed a definite love for their country, a love without which the last few weeks would not have been possible, but it’s fair to say not many looked around their ancient and storied nation with pride. But this has definitely changed. Egyptians are now proud enough of their country to clean up the streets. They are proud to see that as they seek a better life, the rest of the world virtually stopped in suspense, and most importantly they are proud enough to recognize that they have been blessed with a country that they can now change for the better.
2. A whole is equal to the sum of its parts – Any Egyptian has numerous stories reflecting this. A political party, a religious faction, or a disgruntled minority did not sustain the January 25th Revolution. The hundreds of thousands, if not millions that took to the streets in cities and towns across Egypt sustained it. The men who protected their neighborhoods through long nights sustained it. Those directing traffic with no incentives sustained it. Doctors and nurses who provided pro bono care to those injured sustained it. Any of the millions of Egyptians that did their best to keep life going as the government completely shut down sustained it. People proudly did their part to help one another at no cost sustained it. Two months ago, if someone had told me that Egypt would see days in which there were no police on the streets, I would have envisioned chaos and injustice taking the reigns. And I would have been proven seriously wrong. The police and security forces are not the stewards of this country…its people are.
3. The critical role of media – Especially when Egyptians lacked Internet access and other fundamental forms of communication for any 21st century society, the media stepped in and played a huge role. International media outlets continued their 24-hour coverage despite the continuous detainment of their correspondents and journalists. Individuals such as Al Jazeera’s Ayman Mohyeldin were arrested, only to be released and not only remain in the country, but also continue their coverage for millions around the world.
4. Unity – Regardless of what some people would have you believe, this was a unified revolution in every aspect. This is especially important to highlight in a country with deep religious and socioeconomic divides. People I’ve spoken to abroad express worries that the events that have taken place have left the country wide open for the Muslim Brotherhood to take over. All I can say is if reform is carried out in the same spirit as the protests were, we’re about to bear witness to an Egypt with more equal opportunities and less marginalization. One day when leaving Tahrir Square with my cousin, an older man with a beard asked us if we knew where to closest mosque was so that he could go pray. We responded saying no, and that we are Christian. He then looked at us and asked, “Are you Egyptians?
”  We said “Yes” and he replied “We’re all Egyptians… we’re all the same.”

5. Change does not necessarily entail chaos – It’s an age-old dilemma, especially with regard to the Arab World: Isn’t stability more important than democracy and reform? For weeks, Mubarak and Suleiman menacingly presented themselves as beacons of stability, as opposed to the alleged inevitable chaos that would take place in their absence…some people even fell for it. Suggestions by international leaders and analysts that the region needs strong dictators to preserve long-term stability are borderline insulting – an insinuation that people in the region are incapable of responsibly governing themselves. In reality, if long-term stability depends on a small group of people and their cronies, then we all have bigger problems. As Egyptians prepare for a 2011 of economic challenges, they know that they have the assets to not only bounce back, but to come back even stronger without a corrupt regime siphoning billions of dollars from those who truly deserve it. The country still has a long way to go to transform into the nation that many Egyptians want it to be, but as long as those who desire change remain committed, it’s inevitable. Decades of corrupt governance suppressing intellectual and social rights hardened the Egyptian people- a group historically characterized by its light- heartedness and openness. But, as someone proudly told me…”Egyptian history stopped for 30 years, but now it’s back.”

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